Dangerous paintings (part 3)

This is the last part of my review of the article “Dangerous paintings” written (in Russian) by Pauline Larina.

In the part 1 Larina wrote about dangerous paintings in America (SEE HERE) and in the part 2 about such paintings in Russia (HERE).

Naturally, she wrote about dangerous paintings in Europe too.

She states, that a mass-produced print of the painting “The Crying Boy” by Italian painter Bruno Amadio, also known as Giovanni Bragolin burned many houses in the North of England in the 1980s.

According to Pauline, the artist’s son was a model for the painting. However, a boy did not cry and the artist started to burn matches near his face.

Then the boy shouted: “I want you to burn!”. Very soon the boy died from pneumonia and there was a fire in the artist’s house. The artist and almost all his paintings burned in the fire.

I want to add here that my brief research on the internet tells a different but still very interesting story. You can read it HERE.

Pauline Larina also mentions “Water Lilies” by Claude Monet. She says that soon after he finished the painting there was a fire in his studio. Later there were fires in other places where there was this painting: a cabaret on Montmartre, in the house of a French collector of art, in the New York Museum of Modern Art.

Finally, Pauline Larina tells that some paintings carefully studied by experts. Chemists explore the paint and canvas, physics – the impact of sunlight on the image, etc.

Some professionals in Russia came to conclusion that one icon in the Hermitage distributed mighty energy around itself, making a human brain to vibrate at high frequency.

Similar conclusions about energy from paintings came from researchers in the Pinakothek in Munich, in the Louvre, in other galleries.

Larina says that if some painting makes you uncomfortable you should urgently walk away from it.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Dangerous paintings (part 3)

    • I would not call it research. I am not sure about “facts” here.
      But I am convinced that our knowledge is very limited and we
      must be ready to many surprises.

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