Shooting sunrise

After shooting spectacular sunrises myself (example below) I later

Sunrise in Hollywood, Florida by JF

Sunrise in Hollywood, Florida by JF

photographed a group of people who was doing the same.

Why do you think I chose this group?

What other title can you suggest to the photo?

Shooting sunrise by JF

Shooting sunrise by JF

Energy: nature and humanity

SCALE

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Sunday stills: LOVE

SUNDAY STILLS: LETTER L-

For me CHILDREN = LOVE.

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Quotes to think about

People spend too much time finding other people to blame, too much energy finding excuses for not being what they are capable of being, and not enough energy putting themselves on the line, growing out of the past, and getting on with their lives.

J. Michael Straczynski

A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination.

Nelson Mandela

If you’re trying to achieve, there will be roadblocks. I’ve had them; everybody has had them. But obstacles don’t have to stop you. If you run into a wall, don’t turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it.

Michael Jordan

I believe that we are solely responsible for our choices, and we have to accept the consequences of every deed, word, and thought throughout our lifetime.

Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

The way you see people is the way you treat them, and the way you treat them is what they become.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Dangerous paintings (part 3)

This is the last part of my review of the article “Dangerous paintings” written (in Russian) by Pauline Larina.

In the part 1 Larina wrote about dangerous paintings in America (SEE HERE) and in the part 2 about such paintings in Russia (HERE).

Naturally, she wrote about dangerous paintings in Europe too.

She states, that a mass-produced print of the painting “The Crying Boy” by Italian painter Bruno Amadio, also known as Giovanni Bragolin burned many houses in the North of England in the 1980s.

According to Pauline, the artist’s son was a model for the painting. However, a boy did not cry and the artist started to burn matches near his face.

Then the boy shouted: “I want you to burn!”. Very soon the boy died from pneumonia and there was a fire in the artist’s house. The artist and almost all his paintings burned in the fire.

I want to add here that my brief research on the internet tells a different but still very interesting story. You can read it HERE.

Pauline Larina also mentions “Water Lilies” by Claude Monet. She says that soon after he finished the painting there was a fire in his studio. Later there were fires in other places where there was this painting: a cabaret on Montmartre, in the house of a French collector of art, in the New York Museum of Modern Art.

Finally, Pauline Larina tells that some paintings carefully studied by experts. Chemists explore the paint and canvas, physics – the impact of sunlight on the image, etc.

Some professionals in Russia came to conclusion that one icon in the Hermitage distributed mighty energy around itself, making a human brain to vibrate at high frequency.

Similar conclusions about energy from paintings came from researchers in the Pinakothek in Munich, in the Louvre, in other galleries.

Larina says that if some painting makes you uncomfortable you should urgently walk away from it.

 

 

Andrew Carnegie’s quotes

“He that cannot reason is a fool. He that will not is a bigot. He that dare not is a slave.”
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“You cannot push anyone up a ladder unless he is willing to climb a little.”
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“If you want to be happy, set a goal that commands your thoughts, liberates your energy, and inspires your hopes.”
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“A man who acquires the ability to take full possession of his own mind may take possession of anything else to which he is justly entitled.”
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 “Perhaps the most tragic thing about mankind is that we are all dreaming about some magical garden over the horizon, instead of enjoying the roses that are right outside today.”
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