I was proud of America in 1941!

There are people in America today that are not proud of their country.
These people don’t know history or prefer to forget it.

The post below reminds how America saved the world from the Nazi Germany.

During my lifetime America helped many countries to recover after the WW2, saved or freed many countries from Communism, helped and continues to help many countries to develop their economies, to fight diseases.

I was shocked today to find out that students of UCLA voted to ban the American flag in the student area.

“Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS

On June 22, 1941 without declaration of war Germany invaded the Soviet Union. At that time I was 7 years old.

In 73 years I wrote about that day and the Great Patriotic War in the post MY MOTHER’S BIRTHDAY.

Odessa was occupied during the war and my mother and I were fortunate to reach Sverdlovsk in the Ural Mountains and to rent a small room there. My mother was a nurse in a military hospital and she was able to come to our room only on Sundays for several hours

All other days I stayed in the room reading everything I could find. Our landlords, two mighty sisters about 65 years old, helped me daily to do the most important thing: to get my food ration.

During winter the situation in the city was especially bad. Food rations were tiny and there was impossible to get berries or…

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Life is full of surprises or robbers, where are you?! (Part 3)

My wife and children were waiting for me.

They looked at the parcel in my hands and instruments and it was clear that they wanted to open parcels immediately and to find out what was in it.

However, I suggested that we needed to warm ourselves first. So we had a morning run and a good workout, then we ate hot breakfast. After it we were ready.

It took considerable efforts to open six parcels. Then we saw that there was a mixture of brown and white in all of them.

My wife cautiously took several white crystals and licked them. She said: “It’s sugar”. Next she took out several brown kernels and said: “Buckwheat!” Then she took out many pieces of brown paper and started to cry.

Children and I looked at her with alarm. What was going on? Why was she crying?

A couple of minutes passed. Then my wife stopped crying and explained: “In last letter I wrote that I could not find buckwheat here. Apparently, mothers decided that we had nothing to eat. They bought buckwheat and sugar and put paper packs with them in parcels. People in the USSR pierced each pack many times. Now we’ll have to find a way to separate sugar and buckwheat.”

We stayed in Lido di Ostia two more months. Each day we spent some time separating sugar and buckwheat.

I remembered at that time that my wife did not know her father. He was arrested and shot without trial when she was three months old. 30 years later her mother received a letter from a government that he was innocent.

I remembered that my grandfather was arrested, tortured and then released because he did not do anything wrong. However, he died in three months after his release.

I remembered that after we applied for a permission to leave the USSR we were treated as enemies of the state. We were lucky to get the permission but authorities forced us to pay substantial sum for every member of the family and then allowed to take with us only $400. We left behind our savings for many years of hard work.

I thought how lucky we were to escape from the Soviet Union whose government managed to murder 30 millions of its own people.

We were lucky to leave robbers of dignity, freedom and happiness behind.

I never expected that we would find people in America who would think that socialism could be good.

“Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery..”
Winston S. Churchill

Life is the best motivator!

I think that majority of my followers did not read this post.
During our 40 years in America we often heard: “I want it and I want it now!” My responses are: “What did you do to get it?” and “Go for it!”

PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS

There are many good motivational blogs in the WordPress blogosphere. They are well written and many of them contain beautiful uplifting photos and wise quotes of famous people.

However, I believe that life is the best motivator.

Let me share with you our experience.

My wife and I came in the USA in 1975 with two children. My wife did not know English at all. I believed that I knew English as in the USSR I translated many scientific papers and was able to communicate with foreigners in English. However, my first days in New York were terrible. I could not understand people and people could not understand me.

What did we do?

I found a job as a cutter in a tie factory. I worked 8 hours daily and spent 4 hours to go to work and back. There were 4-5 hours for sleep. All remaining hours I read books by…

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My friend artist Vladimir Ryklin.

Both of us lived in Moscow for many years but we did not know each other there. In 1975 we emigrated with our families and then we met in the small inn on the 35th street between 5th and 6th avenues.

Vladimir did not know English at all so it was my task to find good and cheap apartments for rent in some beautiful and peaceful area of New York City. I was fortunate to find such apartments for our families on the same floor of a building in Rego Park in Queens.

We and our children became friends. I was very interested in Vladimir’s work. We discussed his projects, what were his thoughts when he worked on any painting, his thoughts about art and artists.

Vladimir’s paintings were not simple or just beautiful. They were always thoughts provoking.

In 1975 I also met a businessman Eduard Nakhamkin and I suggested to him that it could be a very good idea to open an art gallery in Manhattan and to introduce Russian artists to American public. The gallery opened in 1977 and Vladimir Ryklin’s one-man show was the first.

I remember that there were 27 paintings on the display at that time and 25 of them were sold during first two days.

Today I found an article about my friend Vladimir Ryklin with several of his paintings. You can read it HERE.

An artist and a sculptor Georgy Kurasov.

There were always many talented people in Russia.

They appeared despite wars, revolutions, mass repressions, famines, terrible conditions of living.

Georgy Kurasov is one of them. Please read about his life and see his art below.

ART OF KURASOV